Comparative Tort Law – Global Perspectives (Edward Elgar 2021), by Mauro Bussani and Anthony Sebok

Common questions This book is an edited collection of twenty-four essays aiming to provide a framework for reflection and analysis about tort law and its recent developments in ‘Western’ and ‘non-Western’ legal systems. The fixed point that guided the selection of authors and topics in the book is the idea that tort is a concept … Continue reading Comparative Tort Law – Global Perspectives (Edward Elgar 2021), by Mauro Bussani and Anthony Sebok

The legal recognition of non-conjugal families in the US, Canada and Europe, by Nausica Palazzo

Families eschewing the paradigm of the traditional marital family are on the rise. These include families which lack a sexual component (so-called non-conjugal couples) or who comprise more than two sexual partners (multiparty relationships such as polyamorous or polygamous ones). Despite significant empirical and normative developments affecting the ways in which we do family in … Continue reading The legal recognition of non-conjugal families in the US, Canada and Europe, by Nausica Palazzo

What makes criminal justice systems effective? A comparative perspective, by Robin Hofmann

In 2006, the US American scholar Robert Bohm coined the term of the McDonaldization of the criminal justice system. Bohm criticized the increased influence of managerialism and efficiency on criminal proceedings. It seems that this critique is not limited to the US but is regularly voiced in other criminal justice systems as well. In Germany, … Continue reading What makes criminal justice systems effective? A comparative perspective, by Robin Hofmann

The Recognition of a Substantive English Public Law through the Privileged Legal Treatment of Public Assets, by Deborah Thebault

Against the backdrop of French public law with its separate administrative and ordinary courts, French lawyers often assume that English law does not have a system of public law, nor a system of public property. This is inaccurate. Starting with the imposition of a feudal structure of property by William the Conqueror in the 11th century, the King soon became … Continue reading The Recognition of a Substantive English Public Law through the Privileged Legal Treatment of Public Assets, by Deborah Thebault

Comparative Corporate Governance (Edward Elgar 2021), by Afra Afsharipour and Martin Gelter

Comparative corporate governance has become a broad research field during the past decades. With the increasing internationalization of law and legal scholarship, the subject has seen a burgeoning volume of research from a practical, theoretical, and empirical perspective. Practically speaking, both internationally and within individual countries, most corporate governance research deals with the interaction between … Continue reading Comparative Corporate Governance (Edward Elgar 2021), by Afra Afsharipour and Martin Gelter

Mergers, Acquisitions and International Financial Regulation: Analysing Special Purpose Acquisition Companies (Daniele D’Alvia, Routledge 2021), reviewed by Milos Vulanovic

In the hearings related to the Securities Enforcement Remedies and Penny Stock Reform Act of 1990, the US Attorney for the District of Utah stated regarding blank check companies (BBCs) initial public offerings (IPO): “[We] find no evidence that these offerings provide any benefit to the US economy or capital formation”. After more than thirty … Continue reading Mergers, Acquisitions and International Financial Regulation: Analysing Special Purpose Acquisition Companies (Daniele D’Alvia, Routledge 2021), reviewed by Milos Vulanovic

Constitutional change in the contemporary socialist world, by Bui Ngoc Son

The Socialist World in Comparative Constitutional Law The collapse of the Soviet bloc in the late twentieth century, which precipitated a massive transition from communism into constitutional democracy in Europe, is one of the most important catalysts of the revival of comparative constitutional law. Scant attention among constitutional comparatists, however, has been given to the … Continue reading Constitutional change in the contemporary socialist world, by Bui Ngoc Son

Capturing a global momentum in children’s rights: Incorporating the Convention on the Rights of the Child into national law, by Ursula Kilkelly

More than 30 years after the adoption by the United Nations of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), a legally binding children’s rights treaty, attention has focused on the imperative of implementation. Under Article 4 of the Convention, states parties must take all appropriate measures to recognise Convention rights and according to … Continue reading Capturing a global momentum in children’s rights: Incorporating the Convention on the Rights of the Child into national law, by Ursula Kilkelly

Springtime for comparative administrative law, by Jean-Bernard Auby

For some time now, there has been a blossoming of comparative administrative law studies. Research and publications, of various national origins, are investigating this subject of common interest, because it concerns issues that are both common to the different legal systems and felt to play an essential role in them as providing for the concrete … Continue reading Springtime for comparative administrative law, by Jean-Bernard Auby

New Project on cross-citations between Supreme Courts in Europe, by Mathias Siems

Recent years have seen a growing volume of research on citations between courts from different countries (in the following: cross-citations) and other forms of judicial dialogue. For example, books by Elaine Mak and Michal Bobek present key insight using qualitative research methods. As far as quantitative research is concerned, the author of this blog post … Continue reading New Project on cross-citations between Supreme Courts in Europe, by Mathias Siems