Albin Eser – Comparative Criminal Law. Development – Aims – Methods. C.H.BECK HART – NOMOS, 2017

Comparative Criminal Law seems to be on the rise, at least in terms of standing on its own feet. However, this was not always the case. When looking into traditional textbooks on “comparative law”, it is amazing to see that this discipline, as a matter of course, seems to have been considered a realm of … Continue reading Albin Eser – Comparative Criminal Law. Development – Aims – Methods. C.H.BECK HART – NOMOS, 2017

Catalonian Independence: Unbounding a Blood and Belonging Constitutional System

Last November, the Spanish Public Prosecutor’s Office announced that it would ask for  long-term prison sentences for the Catalonian politicians who organised and supported the illegal referendum on the 1st of October 2017. The criminal prosecution of political leaders who acted with a clear electoral mandate is worrying for all those who perceive that the … Continue reading Catalonian Independence: Unbounding a Blood and Belonging Constitutional System

Call for panel proposals and papers – ASLC annual meeting

The American Society of Comparative Law (ASCL) has just issued a call for proposals for (1) concurrent panels and (2) a works in progress conference to be held in association with the ASCL 2019 Annual Meeting, which will be held at the University of Missouri School of Law between Thursday, October 17, and Saturday, October … Continue reading Call for panel proposals and papers – ASLC annual meeting

NEW TITLE: GEOFFREY SAMUEL, RETHINKING LEGAL REASONING, Edward Elgard, 2018

A book claiming to rethink legal reasoning would seem to be one making a very bold, if not arrogant, claim. And so the first observation to be made about my new work -- Rethinking Legal Reasoning (Edward Elgar, 2018) -- is that 'rethinking' should perhaps be viewed more modestly. It ought, at least with regard … Continue reading NEW TITLE: GEOFFREY SAMUEL, RETHINKING LEGAL REASONING, Edward Elgard, 2018

New research collection on comparative labour law highlights key issues

Why does comparative labour law matter? The world of work is churning.  Work is now often what we do, rather than where we go.  Yet the concerns remain similar:  obtaining work, earning enough in conditions of dignity, and having certain protections.  As in other fields, comparative law can provide inspiration for tackling fresh challenges as … Continue reading New research collection on comparative labour law highlights key issues

CALL FOR PAPERS – Postgraduate Research Workshop on Comparative Law – 11th – 12th April 2019 Lancaster University

The School of Law, Lancaster University, will host the 2019 BACL Postgraduate Workshop on Comparative Law on 11th-12th April 2019. The BACL Postgraduate Workshop on Comparative Law is designed for doctoral students working on dissertations in the field of comparative legal studies and related subjects. In a round-table setting, the 2-day workshop will address both … Continue reading CALL FOR PAPERS – Postgraduate Research Workshop on Comparative Law – 11th – 12th April 2019 Lancaster University

NEW PUBLICATION: MARY GUY, COMPETITION POLICY IN HEALTHCARE – FRONTIERS IN INSURANCE-BASED AND TAXATION-FUNDED SYSTEMS, INTERSENTIA 2019

How does EU competition law affect national healthcare reforms? Does healthcare merit special treatment, or can competition work in the same way it does in the energy and telecommunications sectors? Are competition reforms in healthcare an end in themselves, or merely a means to the wider aim of modernising healthcare? Can general competition rules be … Continue reading NEW PUBLICATION: MARY GUY, COMPETITION POLICY IN HEALTHCARE – FRONTIERS IN INSURANCE-BASED AND TAXATION-FUNDED SYSTEMS, INTERSENTIA 2019

New publication – Martin Brenncke – Judicial Law-making in English and German Courts, Intersentia, 2018

How far do contemporary English and German judges go when they interpret national legislation? Where are the limits of statutory interpretation when judges venture outside the constraints of the text? Do these limits converge or diverge in both jurisdictions? Judicial Law-making in English and German Courts is concerned with the limits of judicial power in both … Continue reading New publication – Martin Brenncke – Judicial Law-making in English and German Courts, Intersentia, 2018

Inaugural Lecture – Professor Mark Van Hoecke – Queen Mary, 2018

Mark Van Hoecke, Professor of Comparative Law, gave an insightful inaugural lecture on “Do judges reason differently on both sides of the Channel?”, at the School of Law, Queen Mary University of London, on 3rd September 2018. To a keen audience of academics and practitioners, Professor Van Hoecke compared Common Law reasoning with that of … Continue reading Inaugural Lecture – Professor Mark Van Hoecke – Queen Mary, 2018

NEW PUBLICATION: Hélène Tyrrell, Human Rights in the UK and the Influence of Foreign Jurisprudence (Hart 2018)

Human Rights in the UK and the Influence of Foreign Jurisprudence sits in Hart’s ‘Studies in Comparative Public Law’ series, which includes two closely related works: The Use of Foreign Precedents by Constitutional Judges by Tania Groppi and Marie-Claire Ponthoreau; and Judicial Decision-Making in a Globalised World: A Comparative Analysis of the Changing Practices of … Continue reading NEW PUBLICATION: Hélène Tyrrell, Human Rights in the UK and the Influence of Foreign Jurisprudence (Hart 2018)