Rethinking the Role of Law and Legal Institutions in Times of Crisis, by Emilie Ghio

1. The research group 1.1 The IRC Team At the end of 2020, academics and industry professionals came together to form a research group looking at the way in which the COVID-19 has created new challenges for transnational civil and commercial law. The project and research group were granted the status of International Research Collaborative … Continue reading Rethinking the Role of Law and Legal Institutions in Times of Crisis, by Emilie Ghio

Constitutional change in the contemporary socialist world, by Bui Ngoc Son

The Socialist World in Comparative Constitutional Law The collapse of the Soviet bloc in the late twentieth century, which precipitated a massive transition from communism into constitutional democracy in Europe, is one of the most important catalysts of the revival of comparative constitutional law. Scant attention among constitutional comparatists, however, has been given to the … Continue reading Constitutional change in the contemporary socialist world, by Bui Ngoc Son

Dundee Law School’s New Representative – Dr Luca Siliquini-Cinelli – Introduces Himself to the Association’s Community

It is with great pleasure that I write this post to share with the Association’s (BACL) community my own experience as a legal comparatist and philosopher. I hope that the below remarks will inspire young legal comparatists to pursue their objectives wherever they might take them, and despite all the difficulties we are facing in these … Continue reading Dundee Law School’s New Representative – Dr Luca Siliquini-Cinelli – Introduces Himself to the Association’s Community

The Three Methodologies in Comparative Constitutional Theory (Edward Elgar 2018)

The term methodology is conventionally defined as the set of principles that illuminate inquiry in a field. Scholars, moreover, seek to be parsimonious in discussing methodology. We prefer, however, to go back to the root of the term which lies in critically examining and re-examining the path that inquiry takes. Therefore, in the spirit of … Continue reading The Three Methodologies in Comparative Constitutional Theory (Edward Elgar 2018)

O.V. Kresin – COMPARATIVE LEGAL STUDIES: 1750 TO 1835. APPROACHES TO CONCEPTUALIZATION (transl. 2019)

The history of law is a promising domain. A number of legal disciplines, such as legal theory, the philosophy of law, the sociology of law and epistemology do not have their own history. Often they are perceived as elements of an immutable and coherent system of legal knowledge divided into branches, and not as projects … Continue reading O.V. Kresin – COMPARATIVE LEGAL STUDIES: 1750 TO 1835. APPROACHES TO CONCEPTUALIZATION (transl. 2019)

Geoffrey Samuel – Cinema and Law – TEN DOUBLE BILLS FOR THE COMPARATIST (CONTINUED): IMITATING (FORMS OF) LIFE

The worlds of law and of film share a phenomenon caused by the rise of fascism in Europe during the first half of the twentieth century. Law faculties (in the UK and in North America) and Hollywood studios saw an influx of emigres fleeing the Nazis and this influx had a profound effect both on … Continue reading Geoffrey Samuel – Cinema and Law – TEN DOUBLE BILLS FOR THE COMPARATIST (CONTINUED): IMITATING (FORMS OF) LIFE

From the “Democratic Deficit” to a “Democratic Surplus”: Constructing Administrative Democracy in Europe

When academics, policymakers, media commentators, and citizens talk about a European Union (EU) “democratic deficit,” they often miss part of the story. My new book, From the “Democratic Deficit” to a “Democratic Surplus”: Constructing Administrative Democracy in Europe (Oxford University Press, 2017), challenges the conventional narrative of an EU “democratic deficit.” It argues that EU … Continue reading From the “Democratic Deficit” to a “Democratic Surplus”: Constructing Administrative Democracy in Europe

Geoffrey Samuel – Cinema and Law – Ten double Bills for the comparatist (continued) : I’d rather have the blues (than what I got)

This third blog on double bills for the comparatists comes with a very strong trigger warning – both metaphorical and literal. The two films about to be discussed will certainly not be to every comparative lawyer’s taste – they are bleak and violent – and indeed I have hesitated about including them in the top … Continue reading Geoffrey Samuel – Cinema and Law – Ten double Bills for the comparatist (continued) : I’d rather have the blues (than what I got)