Account – U Kischel, “Theorising legal transplants?”, BACL Seminar, Preston, 3rd September 2019

At the BACL Seminar in Preston on 3rd September 2019, Professor Uwe Kischel explained his approach to legal transplants. Professor Kischel is the Mercator Chair of Public Law, European Law and Comparative Law at the University of Greifswald (Germany) and the author of Comparative law (OUP 2019). Here is an account of his engaging presentation … Continue reading Account – U Kischel, “Theorising legal transplants?”, BACL Seminar, Preston, 3rd September 2019

‘THE WORLD WILL HEAR FROM ME AGAIN…’: ORIENTALISM IN THE CINEMA (AND IN LAW) – Geoffrey Samuel

In an earlier blog mention was made of 'orientalism'. This is a notion that will be familiar to comparative lawyers thanks to the work of Teemu Ruskola who has coined the expression ‘legal orientalism’ ((2002) 101 Michigan LR 179). ‘Orientalism’ is a post-colonial word giving expression to a particular kind of colonialist vision of Asian … Continue reading ‘THE WORLD WILL HEAR FROM ME AGAIN…’: ORIENTALISM IN THE CINEMA (AND IN LAW) – Geoffrey Samuel

Reasons and Context in Comparative Law: Workshop to mark the retirement of Professor John Bell

The Centre for European Legal Studies (Cambridge) kindly sponsored a Comparative law workshop in honour of John Bell, who is retiring in September 2019. The workshop, which was organised by Dr Turenne, was a small gathering of colleagues and former students from Australia, Chile, France, the Netherlands, the USA in addition to colleagues and former … Continue reading Reasons and Context in Comparative Law: Workshop to mark the retirement of Professor John Bell

2019 Annual Seminar – Legal Transplants and Mixed Jurisdictions – In Honour of the Late Prof. Alan Watson

University of Central Lancashire 3 September 2019 9.30-12.20 Welcome President of BACL, Annette Nordhausen Scholes, & sponsors, Intersentia.   Session 1 (9.45-11.00)   Prof. John Cairns (Edinburgh): The Birth of Mixed Legal Systems in the British Empire   Prof. Dr. Uwe Kischel (Greifswald): Theorising Legal Transplants? (for an account of this presentation - click here) … Continue reading 2019 Annual Seminar – Legal Transplants and Mixed Jurisdictions – In Honour of the Late Prof. Alan Watson

NEW TITLE: GEOFFREY SAMUEL, RETHINKING LEGAL REASONING, Edward Elgard, 2018

A book claiming to rethink legal reasoning would seem to be one making a very bold, if not arrogant, claim. And so the first observation to be made about my new work -- Rethinking Legal Reasoning (Edward Elgar, 2018) -- is that 'rethinking' should perhaps be viewed more modestly. It ought, at least with regard … Continue reading NEW TITLE: GEOFFREY SAMUEL, RETHINKING LEGAL REASONING, Edward Elgard, 2018

New research collection on comparative labour law highlights key issues

Why does comparative labour law matter? The world of work is churning.  Work is now often what we do, rather than where we go.  Yet the concerns remain similar:  obtaining work, earning enough in conditions of dignity, and having certain protections.  As in other fields, comparative law can provide inspiration for tackling fresh challenges as … Continue reading New research collection on comparative labour law highlights key issues

Geoffrey Samuel – Cinema and Law – TEN DOUBLE BILLS FOR THE COMPARATIST (CONTINUED): IMITATING (FORMS OF) LIFE

The worlds of law and of film share a phenomenon caused by the rise of fascism in Europe during the first half of the twentieth century. Law faculties (in the UK and in North America) and Hollywood studios saw an influx of emigres fleeing the Nazis and this influx had a profound effect both on … Continue reading Geoffrey Samuel – Cinema and Law – TEN DOUBLE BILLS FOR THE COMPARATIST (CONTINUED): IMITATING (FORMS OF) LIFE

Geoffrey Samuel – Cinema and Law – Ten double Bills for the comparatist (continued) : I’d rather have the blues (than what I got)

This third blog on double bills for the comparatists comes with a very strong trigger warning – both metaphorical and literal. The two films about to be discussed will certainly not be to every comparative lawyer’s taste – they are bleak and violent – and indeed I have hesitated about including them in the top … Continue reading Geoffrey Samuel – Cinema and Law – Ten double Bills for the comparatist (continued) : I’d rather have the blues (than what I got)