Droit(s) constitutionnel(s) comparé(s) (2n edn Economica 2021), by Marie-Claire Ponthoreau

“Comparative constitutional law" is a difficult subject to grasp. Such a statement may surprise or even confuse readers, especially students. The new edition of Droit(s) constitutionnel(s) comparé(s) sets to unpack this difficult subject. Why such a statement? Because "constitutional law" refers not only to the body of positive law rules that have a power within the legal … Continue reading Droit(s) constitutionnel(s) comparé(s) (2n edn Economica 2021), by Marie-Claire Ponthoreau

The Recognition of a Substantive English Public Law through the Privileged Legal Treatment of Public Assets, by Deborah Thebault

Against the backdrop of French public law with its separate administrative and ordinary courts, French lawyers often assume that English law does not have a system of public law, nor a system of public property. This is inaccurate. Starting with the imposition of a feudal structure of property by William the Conqueror in the 11th century, the King soon became … Continue reading The Recognition of a Substantive English Public Law through the Privileged Legal Treatment of Public Assets, by Deborah Thebault

Comparative Corporate Governance (Edward Elgar 2021), by Afra Afsharipour and Martin Gelter

Comparative corporate governance has become a broad research field during the past decades. With the increasing internationalization of law and legal scholarship, the subject has seen a burgeoning volume of research from a practical, theoretical, and empirical perspective. Practically speaking, both internationally and within individual countries, most corporate governance research deals with the interaction between … Continue reading Comparative Corporate Governance (Edward Elgar 2021), by Afra Afsharipour and Martin Gelter

The Three Methodologies in Comparative Constitutional Theory (Edward Elgar 2018)

The term methodology is conventionally defined as the set of principles that illuminate inquiry in a field. Scholars, moreover, seek to be parsimonious in discussing methodology. We prefer, however, to go back to the root of the term which lies in critically examining and re-examining the path that inquiry takes. Therefore, in the spirit of … Continue reading The Three Methodologies in Comparative Constitutional Theory (Edward Elgar 2018)

Account – U Kischel, “Theorising legal transplants?”, BACL Seminar, Preston, 3rd September 2019

At the BACL Seminar in Preston on 3rd September 2019, Professor Uwe Kischel explained his approach to legal transplants. Professor Kischel is the Mercator Chair of Public Law, European Law and Comparative Law at the University of Greifswald (Germany) and the author of Comparative law (OUP 2019). Here is an account of his engaging presentation … Continue reading Account – U Kischel, “Theorising legal transplants?”, BACL Seminar, Preston, 3rd September 2019

BACL Postgraduate Workshop Thursday 11th April-Friday 12th April 2019.

Thank you to Dr Mary Guy for organising this year’s annual BACL workshop, which was kindly supported by Intersentia and hosted by Lancaster University. As in previous years, many different comparative research projects were discussed by PhD students in this year’s BACL Post-graduate Workshop. It provided an opportunity for PhD students to discuss their research … Continue reading BACL Postgraduate Workshop Thursday 11th April-Friday 12th April 2019.

Interview with Uwe Kischel on his book Comparative Law (OUP 2019)

Uwe Kischel’s comprehensive treatise on comparative law offers a critical introduction to the central tenets of comparative legal scholarship. The first part of the book is dedicated to general aspects of comparative law. The controversial question of methods, in particular, is addressed by explaining and discussing different approaches, and by developing a contextual approach that … Continue reading Interview with Uwe Kischel on his book Comparative Law (OUP 2019)

Albin Eser – Comparative Criminal Law. Development – Aims – Methods. C.H.BECK HART – NOMOS, 2017

Comparative Criminal Law seems to be on the rise, at least in terms of standing on its own feet. However, this was not always the case. When looking into traditional textbooks on “comparative law”, it is amazing to see that this discipline, as a matter of course, seems to have been considered a realm of … Continue reading Albin Eser – Comparative Criminal Law. Development – Aims – Methods. C.H.BECK HART – NOMOS, 2017

Inaugural Lecture – Professor Mark Van Hoecke – Queen Mary, 2018

Mark Van Hoecke, Professor of Comparative Law, gave an insightful inaugural lecture on “Do judges reason differently on both sides of the Channel?”, at the School of Law, Queen Mary University of London, on 3rd September 2018. To a keen audience of academics and practitioners, Professor Van Hoecke compared Common Law reasoning with that of … Continue reading Inaugural Lecture – Professor Mark Van Hoecke – Queen Mary, 2018

Catherine Valcke – Comparing Law: Comparative Law as Reconstruction of Collective Commitments (forthcoming Cambridge University Press, 25th October 2018)

Traditional comparative law is doing just fine. At any rate much better than has been claimed. It is not theoretically random, scientifically aimless and/or methodologically void, thus an intellectually empty and socially inconsequential form of entertainment, on a par with stamp collecting and baseball statistics hoarding. Only, comparative lawyers have historically been remarkably tight-lipped about … Continue reading Catherine Valcke – Comparing Law: Comparative Law as Reconstruction of Collective Commitments (forthcoming Cambridge University Press, 25th October 2018)