Inaugural Lecture – Professor Mark Van Hoecke – Queen Mary, 2018

Mark Van Hoecke, Professor of Comparative Law, gave an insightful inaugural lecture on “Do judges reason differently on both sides of the Channel?”, at the School of Law, Queen Mary University of London, on 3rd September 2018. To a keen audience of academics and practitioners, Professor Van Hoecke compared Common Law reasoning with that of … Continue reading Inaugural Lecture – Professor Mark Van Hoecke – Queen Mary, 2018

NEW PUBLICATION: Hélène Tyrrell, Human Rights in the UK and the Influence of Foreign Jurisprudence (Hart 2018)

Human Rights in the UK and the Influence of Foreign Jurisprudence sits in Hart’s ‘Studies in Comparative Public Law’ series, which includes two closely related works: The Use of Foreign Precedents by Constitutional Judges by Tania Groppi and Marie-Claire Ponthoreau; and Judicial Decision-Making in a Globalised World: A Comparative Analysis of the Changing Practices of … Continue reading NEW PUBLICATION: Hélène Tyrrell, Human Rights in the UK and the Influence of Foreign Jurisprudence (Hart 2018)

Geoffrey Samuel – Cinema and Law – TEN DOUBLE BILLS FOR THE COMPARATIST (CONTINUED): IMITATING (FORMS OF) LIFE

The worlds of law and of film share a phenomenon caused by the rise of fascism in Europe during the first half of the twentieth century. Law faculties (in the UK and in North America) and Hollywood studios saw an influx of emigres fleeing the Nazis and this influx had a profound effect both on … Continue reading Geoffrey Samuel – Cinema and Law – TEN DOUBLE BILLS FOR THE COMPARATIST (CONTINUED): IMITATING (FORMS OF) LIFE

Merris Amos – Brexit led tinkering with the UK human rights machine: minor adjustment or damaging blow?

Introduction For supporters of the broadest possible reach of human rights law these are troubled times. But for the comparative law scholar these are also very interesting times. Proponents of a ‘hard’ Brexit are trying to expel an entire corpus of law from our legal system whilst simultaneously the Government is trying to negotiate various … Continue reading Merris Amos – Brexit led tinkering with the UK human rights machine: minor adjustment or damaging blow?

Catherine Valcke – Comparing Law: Comparative Law as Reconstruction of Collective Commitments (forthcoming Cambridge University Press, 25th October 2018)

Traditional comparative law is doing just fine. At any rate much better than has been claimed. It is not theoretically random, scientifically aimless and/or methodologically void, thus an intellectually empty and socially inconsequential form of entertainment, on a par with stamp collecting and baseball statistics hoarding. Only, comparative lawyers have historically been remarkably tight-lipped about … Continue reading Catherine Valcke – Comparing Law: Comparative Law as Reconstruction of Collective Commitments (forthcoming Cambridge University Press, 25th October 2018)

Publication of papers from BACL Annual Seminar 2017: Comparing UK and Irish law: A special relationship? – Common Law World Review 2018; 47(1): 3–102

  The latest edition of the 2018 Common Law World Review is dedicated to papers first delivered at a joint seminar of the British Association of Comparative Law and the Irish Society of Comparative Law, held at University College Dublin on 5 September 2017.  This was the first time BACL and ISCL had collaborated in this … Continue reading Publication of papers from BACL Annual Seminar 2017: Comparing UK and Irish law: A special relationship? – Common Law World Review 2018; 47(1): 3–102

Inaugural lecture – Comparative Law – QMUL – 3 September 2018

On Monday, September 3rd, 2018, at 5.30 p.m., Mark Van Hoecke, Professor of Comparative Law at Queen Mary University of London, will deliver his inaugural lecture in the G.O.Jones building on the Mile End campus. His lecture will be on “Do judges reason differently on both sides of the Channel?” The lecture will be followed … Continue reading Inaugural lecture – Comparative Law – QMUL – 3 September 2018

New Publication: Mathias Siems, Comparative Law, 2nd edition (Cambridge University Press 2018)

According to the late John Henry Merryman ‘lawyers are professionally parochial. Comparative law is our effort to be cosmopolitan’. This statement may seem exaggerated, but there is also a good deal of truth in it. Most lawyers are almost entirely trained and specialised in the law of their domestic jurisdiction. Thus, as soon as lawyers … Continue reading New Publication: Mathias Siems, Comparative Law, 2nd edition (Cambridge University Press 2018)

2018 Annual Seminar – Comparative Law in Troubled Times – 4th September, QMUL

Comparative Law in Troubled Times Annual Seminar of the British Association of Comparative Law 4 September 2018 9.30-12.20   Queen Mary University of London Colette Bowe and Martin Harris Room Queens' Building Mile End   Welcome President of BACL, Mrs Annette Nordhausen Scholes, & sponsors, Intersentia.   Session 1 (9.45-11.00)   Professor Merris Amos (Queen … Continue reading 2018 Annual Seminar – Comparative Law in Troubled Times – 4th September, QMUL

New Publication: Paula Giliker ‘What do we mean by EU Tort Law?’ Journal of European Tort Law 2018; 9(1): 1–24

This article is based on a key note paper I gave at the SLS Comparative Law subject section in Dublin in 2017 and I am very grateful to the organisers and the audience for the opportunity to discuss a relatively under-researched topic: the extent to which tort law whose origin is European Union law is … Continue reading New Publication: Paula Giliker ‘What do we mean by EU Tort Law?’ Journal of European Tort Law 2018; 9(1): 1–24