Environmental norm diffusion and domestic legal innovation: The case of specialized environmental courts and tribunals (RECIEL 2022), by J. Michael Angstadt

Environmental court diffusion: mechanisms and meaning Why are specialist environmental courts proliferating around the world? In recent years, researchers have observed a steady increase in these institutions (sometimes also referred to as “environmental courts and tribunals,” “green courts,” “green tribunals,” or “green benches”). However, an important opportunity remained to consider what actors and mechanisms are … Continue reading Environmental norm diffusion and domestic legal innovation: The case of specialized environmental courts and tribunals (RECIEL 2022), by J. Michael Angstadt

Comments on Paul Daly, Understanding Administrative Law in the Common Law World, by Peter Cane

This is the second piece in a series of comments offered on Paul Daly's book Understanding Administrative Law in the Common Law World (OUP 2021) at a meeting hosted by the public law cluster at the Essex Law School on 9th March 2022 and gathering Paul Daly, John Bell (click here for his comments), Peter … Continue reading Comments on Paul Daly, Understanding Administrative Law in the Common Law World, by Peter Cane

Academic Global Trotters: Comparison of the Italian and French Public Law Academics in the UK, by Marie-Claire Ponthoreau

The United Kingdom is a land of welcome for European academics and this is also true for public law specialists. But for how much longer? Among those who have settled here, some are choosing to leave the UK since the Brexit. It is not necessarily a question of returning to their country of birth. My … Continue reading Academic Global Trotters: Comparison of the Italian and French Public Law Academics in the UK, by Marie-Claire Ponthoreau

COMMENTS ON PAUL DALY, Understanding Administrative Law in the Common Law World, by John Bell

This is the first piece in a series of comments offered on Paul Daly's book Understanding Administrative Law in the Common Law World (OUP 2021) at a meeting hosted by the public law cluster at the Essex Law School on 9th March 2022 and gathering Paul Daly, John Bell, Peter Cane and Giacinto della Cananea. … Continue reading COMMENTS ON PAUL DALY, Understanding Administrative Law in the Common Law World, by John Bell

Modern Law and Otherness – The Dynamics of Inclusion and Exclusion in Comparative Legal Thought (Edward Elgar 2019), by Veronica Corcodel

Traditional comparative law has been subject to a variety of critiques and, by now, has been surpassed by new and eclectic approaches. Indeed, over the past two decades or so, the increasing interest in debates on globalisation and Eurocentrism brought new vigour to the field. This book joins these efforts by offering a postcolonial perspective on … Continue reading Modern Law and Otherness – The Dynamics of Inclusion and Exclusion in Comparative Legal Thought (Edward Elgar 2019), by Veronica Corcodel

Conflict of Laws – A Comparative Approach – Text and Cases (Edward Elgar, 2nd ed 2022), by Gilles Cuniberti

This book is the second edition of a casebook which aims at being a teaching tool for a class of comparative private international law (otherwise known as conflict of laws). While the main focus of this post will be on the comparative dimension of the project, it is important to underscore that the book does … Continue reading Conflict of Laws – A Comparative Approach – Text and Cases (Edward Elgar, 2nd ed 2022), by Gilles Cuniberti

Towards future-proof comparative administrative law?, by Pieter Van Cleynenbreugel

A review of Susan Rose-Ackerman’s Democracy and executive power : Policymaking accountability in the US, the UK, Germany and France (Yale University Press, 2021) It cannot be denied that executive power in all its varieties plays an increasingly important role in the operations of modern democratic states. The governance of public health in the wake of … Continue reading Towards future-proof comparative administrative law?, by Pieter Van Cleynenbreugel

Judicial Law-Making in European Constitutional Courts (Routledge 2020), edited by Monika Florczak-Wątor

Research aims and hypothesis Constitutional courts determine the shape of the legal order, not only by derogating unconstitutional norms but also by modifying and supplementing those norms that remain as part of the legal order after being declared constitutional or partially unconstitutional. The latter applies to cases where the provisions are not contested in their … Continue reading Judicial Law-Making in European Constitutional Courts (Routledge 2020), edited by Monika Florczak-Wątor

Oxford Handbook of Comparative Administrative Law, by Peter Cane, Herwig Hofmann, Eric Ip and Peter Lindseth

Recent decades have witnessed a flourishing of the comparative study of public law. While private law has long dominated the field of comparative law more generally, this is changing rapidly. For instance, recent years have seen the publication not only of much individual scholarship but also of notable collective volumes in the fields of comparative … Continue reading Oxford Handbook of Comparative Administrative Law, by Peter Cane, Herwig Hofmann, Eric Ip and Peter Lindseth

Between Comparison and Commensuration, by David Nelken

News of the global advance of the Covid -19 epidemic, as of the varying fortunes of  international and national responses to it, confronts many of us daily (see e.g. here). These accounts of what is happening are in turn based on data generated by national, international and transnational organisations, and illustrated in maps, graphs, tables … Continue reading Between Comparison and Commensuration, by David Nelken