NEW PUBLICATION: MARY GUY, COMPETITION POLICY IN HEALTHCARE – FRONTIERS IN INSURANCE-BASED AND TAXATION-FUNDED SYSTEMS, INTERSENTIA 2019

How does EU competition law affect national healthcare reforms? Does healthcare merit special treatment, or can competition work in the same way it does in the energy and telecommunications sectors? Are competition reforms in healthcare an end in themselves, or merely a means to the wider aim of modernising healthcare? Can general competition rules be … Continue reading NEW PUBLICATION: MARY GUY, COMPETITION POLICY IN HEALTHCARE – FRONTIERS IN INSURANCE-BASED AND TAXATION-FUNDED SYSTEMS, INTERSENTIA 2019

New publication – Martin Brenncke – Judicial Law-making in English and German Courts, Intersentia, 2018

How far do contemporary English and German judges go when they interpret national legislation? Where are the limits of statutory interpretation when judges venture outside the constraints of the text? Do these limits converge or diverge in both jurisdictions? Judicial Law-making in English and German Courts is concerned with the limits of judicial power in both … Continue reading New publication – Martin Brenncke – Judicial Law-making in English and German Courts, Intersentia, 2018

Inaugural Lecture – Professor Mark Van Hoecke – Queen Mary, 2018

Mark Van Hoecke, Professor of Comparative Law, gave an insightful inaugural lecture on “Do judges reason differently on both sides of the Channel?”, at the School of Law, Queen Mary University of London, on 3rd September 2018. To a keen audience of academics and practitioners, Professor Van Hoecke compared Common Law reasoning with that of … Continue reading Inaugural Lecture – Professor Mark Van Hoecke – Queen Mary, 2018

Publication of papers from BACL Annual Seminar 2017: Comparing UK and Irish law: A special relationship? – Common Law World Review 2018; 47(1): 3–102

  The latest edition of the 2018 Common Law World Review is dedicated to papers first delivered at a joint seminar of the British Association of Comparative Law and the Irish Society of Comparative Law, held at University College Dublin on 5 September 2017.  This was the first time BACL and ISCL had collaborated in this … Continue reading Publication of papers from BACL Annual Seminar 2017: Comparing UK and Irish law: A special relationship? – Common Law World Review 2018; 47(1): 3–102

Inaugural lecture – Comparative Law – QMUL – 3 September 2018

On Monday, September 3rd, 2018, at 5.30 p.m., Mark Van Hoecke, Professor of Comparative Law at Queen Mary University of London, will deliver his inaugural lecture in the G.O.Jones building on the Mile End campus. His lecture will be on “Do judges reason differently on both sides of the Channel?” The lecture will be followed … Continue reading Inaugural lecture – Comparative Law – QMUL – 3 September 2018

From the “Democratic Deficit” to a “Democratic Surplus”: Constructing Administrative Democracy in Europe

When academics, policymakers, media commentators, and citizens talk about a European Union (EU) “democratic deficit,” they often miss part of the story. My new book, From the “Democratic Deficit” to a “Democratic Surplus”: Constructing Administrative Democracy in Europe (Oxford University Press, 2017), challenges the conventional narrative of an EU “democratic deficit.” It argues that EU … Continue reading From the “Democratic Deficit” to a “Democratic Surplus”: Constructing Administrative Democracy in Europe

Account: “Citizens-administration: 40 years of administrative reforms”, Aix-en-provence

The Aix-en-provence Centre de recherches administratives (CRA) held its 40th panel discussion on 3-4 November 2017. For the last forty years, the CRA kindly invites academic experts in administrative law from across Europe (Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Luxembourg, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland, the Netherlands, UK) and beyond (Japan, China) to discuss topical … Continue reading Account: “Citizens-administration: 40 years of administrative reforms”, Aix-en-provence

Paula Giliker – Penalty clauses in the private law courts of Europe – To enforce or not to enforce (or to modify)?

Should the courts be able to regulate contractual terms which impose a penalty for breach of contract?   This is a question which goes to the heart of the principle of freedom of contract.  We know that contracting parties will often seek to rely on penalty clauses to “discourage” the other party from breaking the contract … Continue reading Paula Giliker – Penalty clauses in the private law courts of Europe – To enforce or not to enforce (or to modify)?