Social Media, Fundamental Rights and Courts in Europe, by Evangelia Psychogiopoulou and Federica Casarosa

Social media has become the means of communication of our time: it is the means through which online users interact, express their opinions, get information and even find jobs. Social media has been mostly praised for its role in enhancing free speech and the freedom to exchange views and ideas by providing for a forum … Continue reading Social Media, Fundamental Rights and Courts in Europe, by Evangelia Psychogiopoulou and Federica Casarosa

Online discussion – Cases, materials and texts on judicial review of administrative action – 13 July 2021, 2pm (UCT + 2)

REALaw (Review of European Administrative Law) warmly invites you to an online discussion on the edited collection Cases, materials and texts on judicial review of administrative action (Hart 2019) on 13rd July 2021, 2pm (Rome/Amsterdam time).   This casebook asked the question whether a ius commune of administrative law of judicial review was developing in Europe on the basis of … Continue reading Online discussion – Cases, materials and texts on judicial review of administrative action – 13 July 2021, 2pm (UCT + 2)

Civil Courts Coping with Covid-19, by Bart Krans and Anna Nylund

Impact of the Covid-19 pandemic in civil courts - experiences in 23 countries Reports from 23 countries across the globe The unforeseen Covid-19 pandemic has propelled unprecedented transformations in civil proceedings. Numerous countries across the globe have faced and continue to face the question of how to enable courts to handle civil cases despite restrictions … Continue reading Civil Courts Coping with Covid-19, by Bart Krans and Anna Nylund

Towering Judges: A Comparative Study of Constitutional Judges (Cambridge University Press 2021), edited by Rehan Abeyratne and Iddo Porat

Introduction This volume introduces and critically examines a new topic in comparative constitutional law: Towering Judges. The volume discusses nineteen judges of apex and constitutional courts from fourteen jurisdictions. Within their particular settings, each of these judges made a significant impact on the trajectory and development of constitutional law. These judges towered over their peers … Continue reading Towering Judges: A Comparative Study of Constitutional Judges (Cambridge University Press 2021), edited by Rehan Abeyratne and Iddo Porat

JCOERE’s Perspective on European Integration and the Scope of Mutual Trust and Cooperation between Courts: Testing Fairness, by Irene LYNCH FANNON and Jennifer L. L. GANT

Since the beginning of 2019, a team of researchers based principally at the School of Law, University College Cork in Ireland with partners at the Università degli Studi di Firenze in Italy, the Universitea Titu Maiorescu, and INSOL Europe has been working on a project enquiring into judicial cooperation as it supports economic recovery in … Continue reading JCOERE’s Perspective on European Integration and the Scope of Mutual Trust and Cooperation between Courts: Testing Fairness, by Irene LYNCH FANNON and Jennifer L. L. GANT

Engagement Between Legal Orders in the Context of Socio-Economic Rights

Introductory Remarks The protection of socio-economic rights has been lagging behind the protection of civil and political rights at both the national and international levels for many years. This paradox has not been fully resolved yet, despite the relevance of socio-economic rights to the world today. Against this background, my research focuses on socio-economic rights, … Continue reading Engagement Between Legal Orders in the Context of Socio-Economic Rights

THE IMPORTANCE OF URGENT INTERIM ORDERS IN CONTESTING FRENCH GOVERNMENT RULES ON COVID-19

The juge des référés is, in principle, the judge of interim orders. As Art. L511-1 CJA (French administrative justice code) states, he ‘decides by means of measures which have a provisional character’. But this simple description does not give the full picture. There are decisions which are provisional – a stay of execution in a … Continue reading THE IMPORTANCE OF URGENT INTERIM ORDERS IN CONTESTING FRENCH GOVERNMENT RULES ON COVID-19

Virtue, Emotion and Imagination – and Comparative Law? – Amalia Amaya and Maksymilian Del Mar

Why should comparative lawyers be interested in virtue, emotion and imagination? Is not the domain of law one structured by rules, governed by reason, with little, if any, room for anything as subjective and mysterious as emotion and imagination? Despite considerable research – philosophical and historical – in recent decades on emotion and imagination (and … Continue reading Virtue, Emotion and Imagination – and Comparative Law? – Amalia Amaya and Maksymilian Del Mar

Katalin Kelemen – Judicial Dissent in European Constitutional Courts: A Comparative and Legal Perspective, Routledge (Hardback 2018, Paperback 2019)

We are all curious about what happens behind the curtains in a courtroom. When more judges sit on a panel, they have to discuss the case in order to reach a decision. They never do it before the eyes of the public and we are only allowed to know the final outcome of this discussion: … Continue reading Katalin Kelemen – Judicial Dissent in European Constitutional Courts: A Comparative and Legal Perspective, Routledge (Hardback 2018, Paperback 2019)

Reasons and Context in Comparative Law: Workshop to mark the retirement of Professor John Bell

The Centre for European Legal Studies (Cambridge) kindly sponsored a Comparative law workshop in honour of John Bell, who is retiring in September 2019. The workshop, which was organised by Dr Turenne, was a small gathering of colleagues and former students from Australia, Chile, France, the Netherlands, the USA in addition to colleagues and former … Continue reading Reasons and Context in Comparative Law: Workshop to mark the retirement of Professor John Bell