Virtue, Emotion and Imagination – and Comparative Law? – Amalia Amaya and Maksymilian Del Mar

Why should comparative lawyers be interested in virtue, emotion and imagination? Is not the domain of law one structured by rules, governed by reason, with little, if any, room for anything as subjective and mysterious as emotion and imagination? Despite considerable research – philosophical and historical – in recent decades on emotion and imagination (and … Continue reading Virtue, Emotion and Imagination – and Comparative Law? – Amalia Amaya and Maksymilian Del Mar

Katalin Kelemen – Judicial Dissent in European Constitutional Courts: A Comparative and Legal Perspective, Routledge (Hardback 2018, Paperback 2019)

We are all curious about what happens behind the curtains in a courtroom. When more judges sit on a panel, they have to discuss the case in order to reach a decision. They never do it before the eyes of the public and we are only allowed to know the final outcome of this discussion: … Continue reading Katalin Kelemen – Judicial Dissent in European Constitutional Courts: A Comparative and Legal Perspective, Routledge (Hardback 2018, Paperback 2019)

Reasons and Context in Comparative Law: Workshop to mark the retirement of Professor John Bell

The Centre for European Legal Studies (Cambridge) kindly sponsored a Comparative law workshop in honour of John Bell, who is retiring in September 2019. The workshop, which was organised by Dr Turenne, was a small gathering of colleagues and former students from Australia, Chile, France, the Netherlands, the USA in addition to colleagues and former … Continue reading Reasons and Context in Comparative Law: Workshop to mark the retirement of Professor John Bell

New publication – Martin Brenncke – Judicial Law-making in English and German Courts, Intersentia, 2018

How far do contemporary English and German judges go when they interpret national legislation? Where are the limits of statutory interpretation when judges venture outside the constraints of the text? Do these limits converge or diverge in both jurisdictions? Judicial Law-making in English and German Courts is concerned with the limits of judicial power in both … Continue reading New publication – Martin Brenncke – Judicial Law-making in English and German Courts, Intersentia, 2018

NEW PUBLICATION: Hélène Tyrrell, Human Rights in the UK and the Influence of Foreign Jurisprudence (Hart 2018)

Human Rights in the UK and the Influence of Foreign Jurisprudence sits in Hart’s ‘Studies in Comparative Public Law’ series, which includes two closely related works: The Use of Foreign Precedents by Constitutional Judges by Tania Groppi and Marie-Claire Ponthoreau; and Judicial Decision-Making in a Globalised World: A Comparative Analysis of the Changing Practices of … Continue reading NEW PUBLICATION: Hélène Tyrrell, Human Rights in the UK and the Influence of Foreign Jurisprudence (Hart 2018)

Transnational judicial conversations

  Annual Seminar of the British Association of Comparative Law Nottingham University 9 September 2014 (9.30-12.30) Session 1: Judicial conversations in the field of criminal justice Professor Paul Roberts (Nottingham), “Cosmopolitan Criminal Jurisprudence: Beyond Comparison?” Professor Dirk van Zyl Smit (Nottingham), “Transnational judicial conversations about punishment.”   COFFEE BREAK (kindly sponsored by Intersentia)   Session … Continue reading Transnational judicial conversations